Episode 164: Growing Under Protection

This week I’m speaking to horticultural expert Guy Deakins who amongst other things is a garden designer, historic gardens expert, consultant and author of the new book Gardener’s Guide to Protected Growing: Creating a successful, sustainable and health micro-climate in the garden. I wanted to find out a bit more about creating protected environments for plants, and about the positives and negatives and Guy’s book provides comprehensive answers all rooted in scientific research.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Fleas in the garden

What we cover

What is protected growing? 

When thinking about protecting crops, should we look to install a windbreak first of all? How do we know we’re not going to create a frost pocket or channel winds in an unfavourable way?

Does growing on a protected site mean you are usually dealing with an artificial growing medium?

If you want to automate the watering, some good alternatives to hand watering

Avoiding too much light for plants growing in a protected space

Moderating temperatures

Good examples of growing in protected spaces

About Guy Deakins

Since starting his business in 1999, Guy has gained experience in many differing environments from small courtyards and roof gardens in the heart of the city, fen gardens in rural Norfolk, windswept beach-side formal gardens, and country estates designed by twentieth century cognoscente – with just about every beautiful variation in between.

With the coming of the global climate crisis, the focus of the company is always to encourage biodiversity whilst maintaining a good design aesthetic. To this end, Guy studied neuroscience at degree level, so that he could fully understand the brain’s aesthetic pathways when looking at shapes, structures and colours.

Links

Gardener’s Guide to Protected Growing: Creating a successful, sustainable and health micro-climate in the garden by Guy Deakins – Crowood Press, 2022

www.guydeakinsgardening.com

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